[ Pdf Bird's Eye View á dark-fantasy PDF ] by Elinor Florence á chorvatsko.pro

[ Pdf Bird's Eye View á dark-fantasy PDF ] by Elinor Florence á I know that predictions can be hit or miss they certainly are with me but sometimes you ve got to throw one out there, because you feel so passionately that a book deserves wider attention than it s getting.
I feel that way about Birds Eye View, by Elinor Florence What it has in common with Code Name Verity and the BBC serial The Bletchley Circle is a story featuring the sort of smart women who really did contribute to winning WW II, but whose work largely went unsung partly for social reasons and partly because their work was heavily classified for the next half century.
Of course there s going to be a certain element of modern outlook mixed with that of women born right around the time WW I ended Code Name Verity is probably the most contemporary of them, with its cynicism and its implied approval setting up its shocker The TV serial I think Rose Jolliffe Is An Idealistic Young Woman Living On A Farm With Her Family In Saskatchewan After Canada Declares War Against Germany In World War II, She Joins The British Women S Auxiliary Air Force As An Aerial Photographic Interpreter Working With Intelligence Officers At RAF Medmenham In England, Rose Spies On The Enemy From The Sky, Watching The War Unfold Through Her Magnifying GlassWhen Her Commanding Officer, Gideon Fowler, Sets His Sights On Rose, Both Professionally And Personally, Her Prospects Look Bright But Can He Be Trusted As She Becomes Increasingly Disillusioned By The Destruction Of War And Gideon S Affections, Tragedy Strikes, And Rose S World Falls ApartRose Struggles To Rebuild Her Shattered Life, And Finds That Victory Ultimately Lies Within Herself Her Path To Maturity Is A Painful One, Paralleled By The Slow, Agonizing Progress Of The War And Canada S Emergence From Britain S Shadow Rose Jolliffe is a young Canadian woman who lives in a small Saskatchewan town called Touchwood She s naive and inexperienced but smart enough to brazen her way into a job at the local newspaper She longs to join the military to participate in Canadians helping to win the war like her brother and male friends Finally she finds a way to pay her own way to England and join the Royal Air Force Along the way she finds some discrimination against Canadians and struggles to represent her country well.
Rose becomes part of a unit assigned to perform photographic interpretations of aerial photos taken on spy and bombing runs It is important work as it helps determine troop movements, defenses, damage, and other strategic fighting information Rose has an e Since I am the author, obviously I am going to enjoy my own book But as an objective reader of historical fiction, I can say that this is the only novel ever written, to my knowledge, that has a Canadian woman in the Air Force as the protaganist If someone else knows about one, I will stand corrected I interviewed women vets and did an enormous amount of research to make the book historically accurate And I find the subject of aerial photo interpretation fascinating I hope other readers will agree.
I know that predictions can be hit or miss they certainly are with me but sometimes you ve got to throw one out there, because you feel so passionately that a book deserves wider attention than it s getting.
I feel that way about Birds Eye View, by Elinor Florence What it has in common with Code Name Verity and the BBC serial The Bletchley Circle is a story featuring the sort of smart women who really did contribute to winning WW II, but whose work largely went unsung partly for social reasons and partly because their work was heavily classified for the next half century.
Of course there s going to be a certain element of modern outlook mixed with that of women born right around the time WW I ended Code Name Verity is probably the most contemporary of them, with its cynicism and its implied approval setting up its shocker The TV serial I think Sadly I went into this knowing nothing about Canada in WWII, just one of the gaps in my knowledge I wasn t even aware of before So, yay, I now have a nice overview to fill that in a bit And the Canadian aspect is important, because the relationship with Britain is so different from that of the United States, and because so many volunteered so soon Rose from Saskatchewan makes an excellent POV character She s appalled by the shortages and the classism, but captivated by the history and stoicism.
She is, as well, clever, which I like generally, but specifically here I love, having recently watched The Bletchley Circle Rose becomes involved in photographic interpretation, an aspect of intelligence about which I previously knew nothing.
Such rich storytelling six years of war, two continents, a teen girl growing up, losing illusions, discovering her strengths Sadly I went into this knowing nothing about Canada in WWII, just one of the gaps in my knowledge I wasn t even aware of before So, yay, I now have a nice overview to fill that in a bit And the Canadian aspect is important, because the relationship with Britain is so different from that of the United States, and because so many volunteered so soon Rose from Saskatchewan makes an excellent POV character She s appalled by the shortages and the classism, but captivated by the history and stoicism.
She is, as well, clever, which I like generally, but specifically here I love, having recently watched The Bletchley Circle Rose becomes involved in photographic interpretation, an aspect of intelligence about which I previously knew nothing.
Such rich storytelling six years of war, two continents, a teen girl growing up, losing illusions, discovering her strengths I got a free copy of this book from Netgalley It is a quick and easy read, but a lovely book It takes place during WWII, and starts in the prairies and then moves to England, where Rose, the narrator, is part of a unit that reviews endless photos to detect what is going on on the ground in Germany Rose is a good character confident, smart and somewhat naive at times One of the surprisingly and quirky best things about the book are Rose s descriptions and love of farming and the natural world Also her observations about the differences between England and Canada, although somewhat simplistic, are well done Ultimately, the story line is not that surprising and, despite the subject matter and the sad events in the book, the characters are all a bit unrealistically well intentioned and upbeat with one notable except I know of Bletchley Circle I know of spies I d never heard of photographic interpreters But when you sit down and think of it, of course they existed of course they did their bit and they were very important to the war effort of course some of them were women.
But first, let me say how much I liked this book and why I loved the heroine She makes mistakes, learns from them, improves herself, has bad moments, and gets back up I loved the subtle theme that war may seem glamorous at first, but it is so not It s sad, tragic, and leaves a trail of heartbreak in its wake I love the funny bits in the middle of all this sadness the woman with her hair in rollers in the bomb shelter, the backward movie of the queen, the funny dance floor episode I literally laughed out loud The fact there were such funny moments in a mostly serious story was a m I could not put this book down There are so many books out there set during WW II, this one is different and worth the read It follows a young Canadian girl from Saskatchewan to England to do her part for the war effort She becomes an aerial photographic interpreter, looking for German weapons launching sites, troop movements, anything to help the Allies in the fight I have never read anything about this branch of the military before and I found it very interesting The author was born and raised in the North Battleford, Sask area, and I have read that the hometown of Touchwood in the novel is based on North Battleford The airport here was one of the flight training centres during the war, just as the Touchwood airport was The buildings built for the training were meant to be temporary, but some are still standing I really liked the letters at the end of every chapter, and how Rose grew This was such a delightful surprise Without Sherwood Smith s fervent recommendation, I might never have picked this up, but I m so glad I did I come to this from the no doubt not unique but interesting perspective of having British parents who were about the same age as the main characters here, who both lived through WWII My mum looked after evacuated children and my dad was in the RAF, though a telegraph operator rather than a flyer When I was seven, we immigrated to Canada, so I have both sides of this story in my own background I grew up hearing stories of the War it was the defining period in my parents lives, as no doubt it was for so many of that generation and have seen my share of WWII movies But somehow this novel really brought things to life in a new way It s meticulously researched, and I didn t catch any historical inaccuracies and only Another gem of historical fiction from Dundurn Bird s Eye View by Elinor Florence tells the story of a naive Saskatchewan farmer s daughter joining the ranks of the WRAF after her RAF pilot is killed flying in the Commonwealth Training Program Rose sails to Britain, and serves as an interpreter of images taken by bombers over Europe She has a natural eye for detail in this demanding work.
But the book is much than this It is a coming of age story in the best tradition Rose suffers homesickness, culture shock, military rules, and class snobbery She makes mistakes, falls for the wrong man, is badly injured in a London bombing, and suffers severely during her convalescence.
The author has created a compelling story with excellent research underpinning it all and a very believable protagonist Though I knew something about the work of photo i Relatively little has been written about the role Canadian women played during WW11, the author sheds light with her first novel Birds Eye View tells the story of Rose Jollife, a young woman from Saskatchewan whose town becomes an air training base.
This novel is than an historical fiction for addicts Its alluring storyline, rich prose, vivid description and captivating pace have kept me glued to every word till I reached the final chapter The protagonist is a Canadian woman in uniform Although, Rose is a fictional character and the town of Touchwood is a creation the events are factual Rose joins the air force travels overseas and becomes an interpreter of aerial photographs This is her story seen through Canadian eyes.
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Ms Florence describes the prairies beautifully some will certainly recognized the landscape Rose Jolliffe is a young Canadian woman who lives in a small Saskatchewan town called Touchwood She s naive and inexperienced but smart enough to brazen her way into a job at the local newspaper She longs to join the military to participate in Canadians helping to win the war like her brother and male friends Finally she finds a way to pay her own way to England and join the Royal Air Force Along the way she finds some discrimination against Canadians and struggles to represent her country well.
Rose becomes part of a unit assigned to perform photographic interpretations of aerial photos taken on spy and bombing runs It is important work as it helps determine troop movements, defenses, damage, and other strategic fighting information Rose has an e

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